Notice: session_start(): ps_files_cleanup_dir: opendir(/var/lib/php/session) failed: Permission denied (13) in /var/www/vhosts/gsi.ir/httpdocs/index.php on line 4 GSI.ir - Popular Geology - Learning - | Plate Tectnic | PLATE BOUNDARIES | DIVERGENT BOUNDARIES (TRIPLE JUNCTION)
GEOLOGICAL SURVEY OF IRAN | WWW.GSI.IR
 
فارسی  |     
Home |  Contact Us |  Help 
    Member Login
Username
Password
 
Group name :

  Latest Training
Plate Tectnic
Publisher date : May 2008
Chapter title : PLATE BOUNDARIES
Data title : DIVERGENT BOUNDARIES (TRIPLE JUNCTION)

  In East Africa, spreading processes have already torn Saudi Arabia away from the rest of the African continent, forming the Red Sea. The actively splitting African Plate and the Arabian Plate meet in what geologists call a triple junction, where the Red Sea meets the Gulf of Aden. A new spreading center may be developing under Africa along the East African Rift Zone. When the continental crust stretches beyond its limits, tension cracks begin to appear on the Earth's surface. Magma rises and squeezes through the widening cracks, sometimes to erupt and form volcanoes. The rising magma, whether or not it erupts, puts more pressure on the crust to produce additional fractures and, ultimately, the rift zone.

 

Map of East Africa showing some of the historically active volcanoes(red triangles) and the Afar Triangle (shaded, center) -- a so-called triple junction (or triple point), where three plates are pulling away from one another: the Arabian Plate, and the two parts of the African Plate (the Nubian and the Somalian) splitting along the East African Rift Zone.

  East Africa may be the site of the Earth's next major ocean. Plate interactions in the region provide scientists an opportunity to study first hand how the Atlantic may have begun to form about 200 million years ago. Geologists believe that, if spreading continues, the three plates that meet at the edge of the present-day African continent will separate completely, allowing the Indian Ocean to flood the area and making the easternmost corner of Africa (the Horn of Africa) a large island.

 

Helicopter view (in February 1994) of the active lava lake within the summit crater of 'Erta 'Ale (Ethiopia), one of the active volcanoes in the East African Rift Zone. Two helmeted, red-suited volcanologists -- observing the activity from the crater rim -- provide scale. Red color within the crater shows where molten lava is breaking through the lava lake's solidified, black crust. (Photograph by Jacques Durieux, Groupe Volcans Actifs.)

 

Oldoinyo Lengai, another active volcano in the East African Rift Zone, erupts explosively in 1966. (Photograph by Gordon Davies, courtesy of Celia Nyamweru, St. Lawrence University, Canton, New York.

 

 

 


Related links

External links